Ninja Insulin #dblogcheck

You would think after close to 15 years on the pump I would know all the tricks of the trade, all the quirks of the pump, all of the sneakiness of insulin absorption…..but, nope.

I’ve come up with some blood sugar savers that really do work for me, though….like, when I change out an infusion set site, I used to ALWAYS have high blood sugars for hours afterwards. Thanks to a comment by Katy, I was encouraged to “ka-chunk” in a new site without removing the old one for a few hours, let it settle in & calm down, and then connect up the pump to the new site. Bells ringing, fireworks going off, and a ticker-tape parade later, I rarely have any post-site-change highs anymore, and when I do, they are due to other variables of life.

Sneaky, sneaky....

But lately, I’ve discovered a new brand of insulin….the Ninja Insulin. I swear, I take a bolus for a meal or correction, and go about my business, but my blood sugar remains slightly high. Then, I drink some water, or sometimes, even eat a couple grams of a carb, and whoa! Here comes that insulin out of nowhere, and suddenly I’m on a downward trend of blood sugar. It’s really weird. It’s like it’s been hanging out in the shadows of my bloodstream, just waiting for the right time to take effect. It’s a most puissant ninja.

Don’t forget to #dblogcheck today!!!!

The Cost of Good Health

I am thankful every-single-day that I have good insurance (through my husband’s work.) But it still makes my jaw drop when I see the breakdown of what just 3 months worth of test strips, lancets, and insulin pump supplies cost:

SuppliesCostPic

That does not include insulin itself, or my CGM sensors, which I’m sure would add on more crazy $$. Suffice it to say, I feel confident that without insurance, I would be paying around $1,000- $2,000 per month for all of the prescriptions and supplies I need just to stay alive. Now, could I stay alive using only insulin and syringes, and not using all the fancy technology? Sure. But you’d better believe my *quality* of life would not be the same. Having my insulin pump and CGM have helped me really rein in my blood sugars, which we all know helps keep our bodies from getting worn out so soon from so many highs and lows all over the place. Am I perfect in my blood sugar management? Heck no. But with these tools, I’ve come a long way from when I was on Regular and NPH injections when I was first diagnosed in 1994. My A1Cs were never below 9 until I went on the insulin pump. Ever since, they have been 7 or below, and for several years now, hovering under 6.5. I’d like to keep it that way for as long as possible, and hope and pray I have good insurance and can afford all of my diabetes prescriptions and supplies for the rest of my life (or until they find a cure, right??)

The Finger-Stick Blood Geyser

SAMSUNGI know we’ve all had one of these at some point in time, but this is the first time I’ve documented one of mine in a picture. I couldn’t frame the picture large enough to get the entire swath of my bathroom that the geyser touched, so I just got some of the main bulk here that was in the sink – there was blood spatter on the mirror, on the side wall, and even on my shirt. (I really hate the ones that spray you in the eyes or on your face – ewwww.) It’s like, you prick your finger, and never know if a nice, clean, round drop of blood is going to show up there for you to use and test, or if it’s going to be that one time out of hundreds that decides to “geyser” on you and spray like a fountain of blood from the worst B-rated horror movie you can imagine. I ranked this one a 9 in the amount and diameter span of spatter.