Friday Findings

Today is Friday.  I just found things!

Found it!

  • Was looking in all the pockets/flaps of my diabetes checker-pack, and found the $13 I had stashed in there last Friday (the 13th.) I’d forgotten all about it! The 13s are coincidental, but funny, right? I just had too much cash in my back pocket since I wasn’t carrying a purse, put it there and promptly forgot about it. FOUND MONEY!
  • Dug into the depths of my purse looking for a pen, and found my badge from the Diabetes UnConference!! I had been frantically searching for it on the last day of the conference (thanks to all you guys who looked around with me, like it was a lost contact or something) when all along it was just stuffed into my purse, hidden underneath so many things I didn’t see it. Whew! And in it were all the contact cards for people that I’d picked up, yay!
  • Also in said purse, at the very bottom, I found various room keys from the Flamingo, where were stayed for the UnConference.  Oops, they say on the back that they recycle them. Sorry, Earth! They will now become fake credit cards for my daughter to play with, so that’s like recycling, right?
  • Was out running errands, and found some stray GlucoLift tablet samples I’d picked up at the UnConference. In all my unpacking and reorganizing, they’d ended up under my car seat somehow (??) They saved the day when I started running a smidge low, and wasn’t anywhere near good food at the time.

All in all, a successful day! Now, off to find some things to cook for dinner with all our neighbors!

Diabetes UnConference – A Limerick of Love

There once was a dream and a venture
A weekend spent entirely without censure
We called it the Diabetes UnConference
It was filled with d-victories and confidence
The memories of it all we will treasure.

So much love!

Just a few of the many people I met at the first-ever Diabetes UnConference. We immediately shared a bond and a friendship that is indescribable.

Ninja Insulin #dblogcheck

You would think after close to 15 years on the pump I would know all the tricks of the trade, all the quirks of the pump, all of the sneakiness of insulin absorption…..but, nope.

I’ve come up with some blood sugar savers that really do work for me, though….like, when I change out an infusion set site, I used to ALWAYS have high blood sugars for hours afterwards. Thanks to a comment by Katy, I was encouraged to “ka-chunk” in a new site without removing the old one for a few hours, let it settle in & calm down, and then connect up the pump to the new site. Bells ringing, fireworks going off, and a ticker-tape parade later, I rarely have any post-site-change highs anymore, and when I do, they are due to other variables of life.

Sneaky, sneaky....

But lately, I’ve discovered a new brand of insulin….the Ninja Insulin. I swear, I take a bolus for a meal or correction, and go about my business, but my blood sugar remains slightly high. Then, I drink some water, or sometimes, even eat a couple grams of a carb, and whoa! Here comes that insulin out of nowhere, and suddenly I’m on a downward trend of blood sugar. It’s really weird. It’s like it’s been hanging out in the shadows of my bloodstream, just waiting for the right time to take effect. It’s a most puissant ninja.

Don’t forget to #dblogcheck today!!!!

The Cost of Good Health

I am thankful every-single-day that I have good insurance (through my husband’s work.) But it still makes my jaw drop when I see the breakdown of what just 3 months worth of test strips, lancets, and insulin pump supplies cost:

SuppliesCostPic

That does not include insulin itself, or my CGM sensors, which I’m sure would add on more crazy $$. Suffice it to say, I feel confident that without insurance, I would be paying around $1,000- $2,000 per month for all of the prescriptions and supplies I need just to stay alive. Now, could I stay alive using only insulin and syringes, and not using all the fancy technology? Sure. But you’d better believe my *quality* of life would not be the same. Having my insulin pump and CGM have helped me really rein in my blood sugars, which we all know helps keep our bodies from getting worn out so soon from so many highs and lows all over the place. Am I perfect in my blood sugar management? Heck no. But with these tools, I’ve come a long way from when I was on Regular and NPH injections when I was first diagnosed in 1994. My A1Cs were never below 9 until I went on the insulin pump. Ever since, they have been 7 or below, and for several years now, hovering under 6.5. I’d like to keep it that way for as long as possible, and hope and pray I have good insurance and can afford all of my diabetes prescriptions and supplies for the rest of my life (or until they find a cure, right??)

Insulin = LIFE for Valentine’s Day

http://www.p4dc.com/spare-a-rose/Considering the amount of sweets and candy whirling around the Valentine holiday, you have to know that insulin equals life for ALL of us – without it, glucose would just stir around in our blood stream, wreaking havoc on our bodily systems, making us feel like crap, and would (over time) lead to death. Thankfully, we have access to insulin here in the US, and those who need it can (usually) get it.

But in other countries around the world, people are DYING because they don’t have access to insulin, and children are some of the heaviest hit with need. The IDF is once again raising awareness of this need through their Spare a Rose, Save a Child effort. Through this program, just $5 – the cost of 1 rose for Valentine’s Day – can provide insulin or blood glucose test strips for 1 month for a child in need. The cost of a dozen roses – $60 – can provide insulin or test strips for a child for an entire YEAR. Life. For a year. An amazing gift.

I asked my husband to NOT give me any roses or flowers this year – I would rather that money go to help another person in this world LIVE with diabetes. I am grateful and thankful for the life I have been given, and have plenty of insulin for myself, so the least I can do is give some to others who are not so fortunate. In lieu of giving my daughter’s preschool teachers a gift for Valentine’s Day, I’m going to give them a note that tells them about the program, and how our family has donated and spared at least 20 roses so that we could help 20 children in their honor.

I hope my friends and family will do the same! Donate today at: http://www.p4dc.com/spare-a-rose/give/ 

http://www.p4dc.com/spare-a-rose/faq/

To the Overweight Type 1 Diabetic Considering Weight Loss Surgery

Dear Type 1 with weight issues (like me),

I don’t know your history with diabetes or with your weight, but mine is something like this: I was always healthy and active as a kid, and even into my late teens and early 20s. I didn’t become diabetic until I was 21 years old and in college (after having been on Accutane for a year and also having my tonsils taken out. Did one of those things cause/trigger my diabetes?? The world may never know.) It was crazy and crappy. I initially lost, then gained, then lost weight right after diagnosis. But then I maintained a healthy weight for at least a decade. And then came my 30s. A sedentary job, years spent on birth control pills, and then getting married and having fertility issues (inject tons of stress, hormone shots, hormonal imbalances, you name it ) all led to a sharp incline in weight gain, and also a sharp incline in insulin resistance. With insulin resistance, I had to take more insulin. Taking more insulin, I gained more weight. Gaining more weight, I had to take more insulin. My endo basically told me I had become a Type 1 who also had Type 2 diabetes, and I was put on Metformin to help combat some of my insulin resistance. It helped, but didn’t fix the underlying issue. It was a vicious cycle that I couldn’t seem to break with any amount of dieting and exercising. I had all sorts of back pain, plantar fasciitis in my feet, and barely had enough energy to get through most days. I needed a dramatic change, and I needed it fast.  I was in my 40s, with a 3 year old child that could out-run me. How could I protect her if I couldn’t even protect myself anymore?

So, I did my research. Talked to other friends who had some type of bariatric surgery. Joined a couple of Facebook groups to talk about it. Searched and searched for other T1s who had the surgery, but came up short. I had decided against the more complex gastric bypass (where they reroute all sorts of things) and chose the sleeve (VSG) because it was easier to comprehend how my digestion would change post-surgery, the weight loss would be more gradual, and I felt I could manage my diabetes (and health) better in the long run with this surgery.

Now, I am almost 8 months out from surgery. I finally have energy and can eat (more or less) regular foods. I eat FAR less than ever, focus on eating my protein first, then keep to a minimum amount of carbs over the course of the day.  My goals each day are to eat at least 70g of lean protein, drink 64+ ounces of water, take all my various chewable vitamins and supplements (there are quite a few) and to keep sugar and fat intake around 5g at each meal/ eating time. In order to consume just what I need to consume, but not overfill my “sleeve” stomach, I have to eat several small meals – I am basically “snacking” all day long. I have lost 70 lbs total, and am currently in a “stall” so now I need to switch it up, exercise more, and really work to get the weight to come off. But get this: My insulin requirements went from over 100 units per day, down to about 50 units per day now (that’s meal boluses and basal rate combined.)  I no longer take Metformin. My A1c is sitting pretty & playing nice at 6.1. I’m down 2-3 sizes in most clothes. I can sit comfortably in those super-close stadium seats. I can chase after my daughter. I can play with her on the floor, and then stand up without groaning. My feet don’t hurt nearly as much any more. I’m ready to join the local swimming pool this summer and enjoy it with my family and friends. I *feel* better than I have in YEARS.

This has been a tough road, and it remains challenging. With diabetes, LIFE ITSELF is challenging – we know that. There are days when I have low blood sugars and shake my fist in the air that I am forced to go off my diet plan and eat when I don’t want to. There are days of unexplained highs that send me into a spiraling fatigue, just like before. Juggling exercise and blood sugars and my teeny stomach is even more challenging. Having a crashing low, cramming my face full of an apple and then having my stomach feel like it’s going to explode is NOT fun. But would I say this surgery was a success for me? Even though I still have at least 50-60 lbs left to lose? YES. Every time I will say YES.

But you – all the other overweight Type 1s out there with BMIs in the “morbidly obese” category like I was – you have to make the decision on your own. Every surgery comes with it’s risks and potential complications. For me, the results I’ve had so far, even though I’m not “at goal” have been SO worth it.

Happy to have my life back —

Before-AfterJan2015

Love Rescued Me, too

Here’s a post from a fellow schnauzer lover (remember, I may have Type 1 diabetes, but my mini schnauzer Xena stole my heart forever, and she will  always be the best dog ever :) )This fundraiser only runs through the end of this week, so please order a t-shirt TODAY at https://www.habitbrands.com/c1890_north-carolina-schnauzer-rescue !!!

Love Rescued Me

As you well know, Miss D wouldn’t be the crazy, silly, absolutely adorable doggie I am if not for my furever mommy and her friends at NCSR. Now they are asking for our help!

PLEASE RE-POST AND SPREAD THE WORD

Just in time for Christmas gifts, or even a gift to yourself! NC Schnauzer Rescue (NCSR) is excited to partner with HABIT brands and will receive $10 for every “Love Rescued Me” t-shirt sold!

For 10 days only, starting November 10th, get your t-shirt here, $10 will be donated, and you will love a rescue at the same time. 

love rescued me..#8
$10 can go a LONG way for a rescued dog, and can help fund:
  •  a month’s worth of heartworm protection
  •  needed vaccines like rabies & distemper
  •  spaying or neutering
  •  dental care
  •  medications for special needs rescues
NCSR is a 501c3 non-profit, all-volunteer rescue group.
Together, even more dogs can be rescued by love!!!love rescued me...women's long sleeve love rescued me...junior cap sleeve love rescued me...women's short sleeve love rescued me...men's short sleeve